Saturday, June 22, 2013

Divine Healing ... our body is the Lords

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network
Personal contact: 4spirit@gmail.com


Divine Healing by Andrew Murray has much to say about the Holy Spirit’s place in our lives. In all aspects of our lives, the position, habitation, being a Temple for the Holy Spirit, is emphasized greatly by Andrew Murray. To walk in all of God’s Power is so important to live to the level of life God wants us to live in Spirit. Here are some excerpts from Divine Healing and a link to the book online. The excerpts are from chapters 8 and 9.

Faith puts us in possession of all that the death of Christ and His resurrection have procured for us, and it is not only in our spirit and our soul that the life of the risen Jesus manifests its presence here below; it is in the body also that it would act according to the measure of our faith,

"Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit?" 

When the body is fully subjected to Christ, crucified with Him, renouncing all self-will and independence, desiring nothing but to be the Lord's temple, it is then that the Holy Spirit manifests the power of the risen Savior in the body. Then only can we glorify God in our body, leaving Him full freedom to manifest therein His power, to show that He knows how to set His temple free from the domination of sickness, sin, and Satan. 

Many believers fail to watch over their bodies fail to observe a holy sobriety so as to avoid rendering their bodies unfit for the service of God. Eating and drinking should never impede communion with God; their purpose is, rather, to facilitate communion by maintaining the body in its normal condition. 

He would make us understand that we have regarded our body as our own property, while it belonged to the Lord; and that the Holy Spirit seeks to sanctify all its actions. He leads us to understand that if we yield our body unreservedly to the influence of the Holy Spirit, we shall experience His power in us, and He will heal us by bringing into our body the very life of Jesus; He leads us, in short, to say with full conviction, "The body is... for the Lord."


The complete book on Divine Healing is online. 
This link takes you directly to chapter 8.
It is well worth taking time to read this book. It has such a presence of His Holy Spirit all through it.

Monday, May 13, 2013

Power Through Prayer (20) ... a praying person stirs others to pray

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

personal contact: 4spirit@gmail.com 

Power through Prayer by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer. 

Power Through Prayer, chapter 20, a praying person stirs others to pray: “God works in my behalf. If I should neglect prayer but a single day, I should lose a great deal of the fire of faith.”—Martin Luther 

The call now of prayer to every saint is the Spirit’s loudest and most exigent call. Sainthood’s piety is made, refined, perfected, by prayer. The gospel moves with slow and timid pace when the saints are not at their prayers early and late and long

Where are the Christly leaders who can teach the modern saints how to pray and put them at it? Do we know we are raising up a prayerless set of saints? Where are the apostolic leaders who can put God’s people to praying? Let them come to the front and do the work, and it will be the greatest work which can be done. 

The chief ones must lead in the apostolic effort to radicate the vital importance and fact of prayer in the heart and life of the Church. None but praying leaders can have praying followers. Praying apostles will beget praying saints. 

We are not a generation of praying saints. Non-praying saints are a beggarly gang of saints who have neither the ardor nor the beauty nor the power of saints. Who will restore this breach? The greatest will he be of reformers and apostles, who can set the Church to praying. 

Natural ability and educational advantages do not figure as factors in this matter; but capacity for faith, the ability to pray, the power of thorough consecration, the ability of self-littleness, an absolute losing of one’s self in God’s glory, and an ever-present and insatiable yearning and seeking after all the fullness of God—men who can set the Church ablaze for God; not in a noisy, showy way, but with an intense and quiet heat that melts and moves everything for God. 

God can work wonders if he can get a suitable man... who prays.  Men who can stir things mightily for God, whose spiritual revolutions change the whole aspect of things, are the universal need of the Church. 

The past has not exhausted the possibilities nor the demands for doing great things for God. The Church that is dependent on its past history for its miracles of power and grace is a fallen Church. 

Let us pray ardently that God’s promise to prayer may be more than realized.


The complete chapter on praying people stir others to pray:

The Christian Classics Ethereal Library has many great classic works on Christian Growth by the best of the Saints of Old whose Inspired insights have endured through the ages.

Saturday, May 04, 2013

Power Through Prayer (19) ... deliberation necessary for great results in prayer

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

personal contact: 4spirit@gmail.com

Power through Prayer
by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer. 


Power Through Prayer, chapter 19, deliberation necessary for great results in prayer: 

Our devotions are not measured by the clock, but time is of their essence. The ability to wait and stay and press belongs essentially to our intercourse with God. Calmness, grasp, strength, are never the companions of hurry. 

Short devotions deplete spiritual vigor, arrest spiritual progress, sap spiritual foundations. They are the prolific source of backsliding, the sure indication of a superficial piety; they deceive, blight, rot the seed, and impoverish the soil. 

It is true that Bible prayers in word and print are short, but the praying men of the Bible were with God through many a sweet and holy wrestling hour. They won by few words but long waiting. The prayers Moses records may be short, but Moses prayed to God with fastings and mighty cryings forty days and nights

The statement of Elijah’s praying may be condensed to a few brief paragraphs, but doubtless Elijah, who when “praying he prayed,” spent many hours of fiery struggle and lofty intercourse with God before he could, with assured boldness. The verbal brief of Paul’s prayers is short, but Paul “prayed night and day exceedingly.” The “Lord’s Prayer” is a divine epitome for infant lips, but the man Christ Jesus prayed many an all-night ere his work was done; and his all-night and long-sustained devotions gave to his work its finish and perfection, and to his character the fullness and glory of its divinity. 

Spiritual work is taxing work, and men are loath to do it. Praying, true praying, costs an outlay of serious attention and of time, which flesh and blood do not relish. Few persons are made of such strong fiber that they will make a costly outlay when surface work will pass as well in the market. We can habituate ourselves to our beggarly praying until it looks well to us. We can slight our praying, and not realize the peril till the foundations are gone. 

Hurried devotions make weak faith, feeble convictions, questionable piety. To be little with God is to be little for God. To cut short the praying makes the whole religious character short, scrimp, and slovenly. 

It takes good time for the full flow of God into the spirit. Short devotions cut the pipe of God’s full flow. It takes time in the secret places to get the full revelation of God. Little time and hurry mar the picture. 

Our ability to stay with God in our closet measures our ability to stay with God out of the closet. Hasty closet visits are deceptive, defaulting. We are not only deluded by them, but we are losers by them in many ways and in many rich legacies. Tarrying in the closet instructs and wins. We are taught by it, and the greatest victories are often the results of great waitingwaiting till words and plans are exhausted, and silent and patient waiting gains the crown. Jesus Christ asks with an affronted emphasis, “Shall not God avenge his own elect which cry day and night unto him? 

To pray is the greatest thing we can do: and to do it well there must be calmness, time, and deliberation; otherwise it is degraded into the littlest and meanest of things. True praying has the largest results for good; and poor praying, the least. We cannot do too much of real praying.

We must learn anew the worth of prayer, enter anew the school of prayer.

The complete chapter on deliberation necessary for great results in prayer.
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/bounds/power.XIX.html
The Christian Classics Ethereal Library has many great classic works on Christian Growth by the best of the Saints of Old whose Inspired insights have endured through the ages.



Saturday, April 27, 2013

Power Through Prayer (18) ... ministers need the prayer of the people

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

personal contact: 4spirit@gmail.com

Power through Prayer
by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer. 

Power Through Prayer, chapter 18, ministers need the prayer of the people.

(One note is we all are called to be ministers. We all have a place in minister. So we all need the prayers of each other.) 

Prayer, to the preacher, is not simply the duty of his profession, a privilege, but it is a necessity. Air is not more necessary to the lungs than prayer is to the preacher. It is absolutely necessary for the preacher to pray. It is an absolute necessity that the preacher be prayed for. These two propositions are wedded into a union which ought never to know any divorce: the preacher must pray; the preacher must be prayed for. 

The holier a man is, the more does he estimate prayer; the clearer does he see that God gives himself to the praying ones, and that the measure of God’s revelation to the soul is the measure of the soul’s longing, importunate prayer for God. 

The more the minister’s eyes are opened to the nature, responsibility, and difficulties in his work, the more will he see, and if he be a true minister the more will he feel, the necessity of prayer; not only the increasing demand to pray himself, but to call on others to help him by their prayers. 

Paul did not feel that this urgent plea for prayer was to lower his dignity, lessen his influence, or depreciate his piety.  Called, commissioned, chief of the Apostles as he was, all his equipment was imperfect without the prayers of his people. He wrote letters everywhere, urging them to pray for him. Do you pray for others who minister? Do you pray for them in secret? Public prayers are of little worth unless they are founded on or followed up by private praying.

The plea and purpose of the apostles were to put the Church to praying. 

“Put the saints everywhere to praying” is the burden of the apostolic effort and the keynote of apostolic success. Jesus Christ had striven to do this in the days of his personal ministry. As he was moved by infinite compassion at the ripened fields of earth perishing for lack of laborers and pausing in his own praying—he tries to awaken the sensibilities of his disciples to the duty of prayer as he charges them, “Pray ye the Lord of the harvest that he will send forth laborers into his harvest.” “And he spoke a parable to them to this end, that men ought always to pray and not to faint.”

The complete chapter on ministers need the prayers of the people
The Christian Classics Ethereal Library has many great classic works on Christian Growth by the best of the Saints of Old whose Inspired insights have endured through the ages.

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Power Through Prayer (17) ... prayer marks Spiritual leadership

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

Power through Prayer by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer. 

Power Through Prayer, chapter 17, prayer marks Spiritual leadership.

The apostles knew the necessity and worth of prayer to their ministry. They knew that their high commission as apostles, instead of relieving them from the necessity of prayer, committed them to it by a more urgent need; so that they were exceedingly jealous else some other important work should exhaust their time and prevent their praying as they ought; so they appointed laymen to look after the delicate and engrossing duties of ministering to the poor, that they (the apostles) might, unhindered, “give themselves continually to prayer and to the ministry of the word.”

Prayer is put first, and their relation to prayer is put most strongly—“give themselves to it,” making a business of it, surrendering themselves to praying, putting fervor, urgency, perseverance, and time in it.

How holy, apostolic men devoted themselves to this divine work of prayer! “Night and day praying exceedingly,” says Paul. “We will give ourselves continually to prayer” is the consensus of apostolic devotement.

Apostolic praying was as taxing, toilsome, and imperative as apostolic preaching. They prayed mightily day and night to bring their people to the highest regions of faith and holiness. They prayed mightier still to hold them to this high spiritual altitude. 

Prayer is one of the eminent characteristics of strong spiritual leadership. Men of mighty prayer are men of might and mold things. Their power with God has the conquering tread.

A prayerless Christian will never learn God’s truth; a prayerless ministry will never be able to teach God’s truth. Ages of millennial glory have been lost by a prayerless Church. The coming of our Lord has been postponed indefinitely by a prayerless Church. Hell has enlarged herself and filled her dire caves in the presence of the dead service of a prayerless Church.

The complete chapter on prayer marks Spiritual leadership:
The Christian Classics Ethereal Library has many great classic works on Christian Growth, by the best of the Saints of Old whose works have been passed down through the ages.

Saturday, April 20, 2013

Power Through Prayer (16) ... much prayer the price of the anointing, the unction

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

Power through Prayer by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer. 

Power Through Prayer, chapter 16, much prayer is the price of the anointing, the unction:

In the Christian system unction is the anointing of the Holy Spirit, separating unto God’s work and qualifying for it. This unction is the one divine enablement by which accomplishes the peculiar and saving ends of all efforts for Christ. Without this unction there are no true spiritual results accomplished; the results and forces do not rise above the results of unsanctified speech. Without unction the former is as potent as any human speaker. 

This unction may be simulated. There are many things that look like it, there are many results that resemble its effects; but they are foreign to its results and to its nature. The fervor or softness excited by a pathetic or emotional speech may look like the movements of the divine unction, but they have no pungent, perpetrating heart-breaking force. No heart-healing balm is there in these surface, sympathetic, emotional movements; they are not radical, neither sin-searching nor sin-curing. 

This unction is the consecration force, and its presence the continuous test of that consecration. It is this divine anointing on the preacher that secures his consecration to God and his work. Other forces and motives may call him to the work, but this only is consecration. A separation to God’s work by the power of the Holy Spirit is the only consecration recognized by God as legitimate.

This divine and heavenly oil put on it by the imposition of God’s hand must soften and lubricate the whole man—heart, head, spirit—until it separates him with a mighty separation from all earthly, secular, worldly, selfish motives and aims, separating him to everything that is pure and Godlike.

It is that which transforms him into the image of his divine Master, as well as that by which he declares the truths of Christ with power. It is so much the power in the ministry as to make all else seem feeble and vain without it, and by its presence to atone for the absence of all other and feebler forces.

It is a conditional gift, and its presence is perpetuated and increased by the same process by which it was at first secured; by unceasing prayer to God, by impassioned desires after God, by seeking it with tireless ardor, by deeming all else loss and failure without it.

How and whence comes this unction? Direct from God in answer to prayer. Praying hearts only are the hearts filled with this holy oil; praying lips only are anointed with this divine unction. 

Prayer, much prayer, is the price of preaching, speaking, the presenter, unction; prayer, much prayer, is the one, sole condition of keeping this unction. Without unceasing prayer the unction never comes to the person sharing Christ’s message. Without perseverance in prayer, the unction, like the manna overkept, breeds worms.

The complete chapter on much prayer is the price of the anointing, the unction.
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/bounds/power.XVI.html 

The Christian Classics Ethereal Library has many great classic works on Christian Growth, by the best of the Saints of Old whose works have been passed down through the ages.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Power Through Prayer (15) ... Unction, Penetrating Power

by Dale Shumaker
Spirit Savvy Network

Finding your mission, Empowering your life through prayer,
Becoming a Missionary in the Marketplace
Leading others to be Missionaries in the Marketplace

Power through Prayer by E. M. Bounds is becoming a book on prayer that is being highly recommended. Many great people of faith have said Bounds has been a major influence in having a dedicated prayer life. Here are summaries of the chapters in Power through Prayer.

Power Through Prayer, chapter 15, Unction ... Penetrating Power:

Unction is that indefinable, indescribable something which an old, renowned Scotch preacher describes thus: “There is sometimes somewhat in preaching that cannot be ascribed either to matter or expression,  or from where it comes, but with a sweet violence it pierces into the heart and affections and comes immediately from the Word.”

We call it unction. It is this unction which makes the word of God “quick and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.” It is this unction which gives such point, sharpness, and power, and which creates such friction and stir in many.

A baptism of this unction, makes the letter of the Word become embellished and fired by a mysterious power, in that a throbbing of life begins—life which receives or life which resists. The unction pervades and convicts the conscience and breaks the heart.

Unction is simply putting God in his own word. By mighty and great prayerfulness and by continual prayerfulness, it is all potential and personal to the speaker; it inspires and clarifies his intellect, gives insight and grasp and projecting power; it gives to the person heart power, which is greater than head power; and tenderness, purity, force flow from the heart by it.

Enlargement, freedom, fullness of thought, directness and simplicity of utterance are the fruits of this unction.

This unction comes to the preacher not in the study but in the closet. It is heaven’s distillation in answer to prayer. It is the sweetest exhalation of the Holy Spirit. It impregnates, suffuses, softens, percolates, cuts, and soothes. It carries the Word like dynamite, like salt, like sugar; makes the Word a soother, an arranger, a revealer, a searcher; makes the hearer a culprit or a saint, makes him weep like a child and live like a giant; opens his heart and his purse as gently, yet as strongly as the spring opens the leaves.

This unction is not the gift of genius. It is not found in the halls of learning. No eloquence can woo it. No industry can win it. No prelatical hands can confer it. It is the gift of God—the signet set to his own messengers. It is heaven’s knighthood given to the chosen true and brave ones who have sought this anointed honor through many an hour of tearful, wrestling prayer.

It takes a diviner endowment, a more powerful energy than earnestness or genius or thought to break the chains of sin, to win estranged and depraved hearts to God, to repair the breaches and restore the Church to her old ways of purity and power. Nothing but this holy unction can do this.

The complete chapter on unction ... penetrating power:
The Christian Classics Ethereal Library and many great classic works on Christian Growth, by the best of the Saints of Old whose works have been passed down through the ages.